Category: Fundy Coastal

5 Must See and Do in Saint Andrews

Alice-Anne at the Blue Heron has these suggestions. Drive on a natural road made by tides while the tide is low. Visit the estate of Sir William Vanhorne on the tidal island. Built in early 1900s. See www.ministersisland.net/van-horne.htm for more. Get up close with hundreds of sea creatures at the Huntsman Marine Centre. See www.huntsmanmarine.ca for more. Visit several historic churches with period architectures. View summer estates of the rich from the Victorian era.

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Bay Of Fundy Fog … it’s a Good Thing!!

Well how can fog be a good thing? It can spoil a day at the beach. It can cause your hair to curl up like a brillo pad.  Yeah, well maybe it can but it can also be beautiful and soft and sometimes even warm.  First off I must explain the cause of our Fundy Fog.  The Bay of Fundy tides range from 25 to, in some areas, as much as 50 feet and are the highest recorded tides in the world.   The reasons for this are many and complex and I will save them for another article.  But needless […]

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Top 5 Things to see in Grand Manan, NB

Brenda of Captains Jewel of Grand Manan recommends the following five things to see in Grand Manan near the Bay of Fundy. Swallowtail Lighthouse Hole in the wall Seal Cove Beach Southern Head Whitehead Island And … Great restaurants are Mclaughlin Wharf Inn (gourmet dining) Galloways (anything is good here)  Ferry Wharf takeout Sailors landing And … Things to do Hiking Kayaking tours Wonderful new boat trip called Top of the Island Tours Whales and Sails Sailboat Whale Watching Tours Seawatch Whale Watching Tours and Puffin Tours

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Kouchibouguac & Fundy Parks

Two National Parks in New Brunswick offer two very different experiences of the Atlantic coastline. Kouchibouguac National Park on the northeast coast borders the Northumberland Straight. The land here is relatively flat so the several hiking trails are ideal for short or long walks that are quite easy for the novice. They range in length from less than a kilometre to the 11 kilometre Kouchibouguac River Trail. It is one way to access the wilderness Sipu Canoe Campground. Wilderness camping in Kouchibouguac National Park is available to hikers, canoe and kayak paddlers and bicyclists. For the drive-in campers during the […]

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There’s Plenty to See and Do on Grand Manan

Visiting the Bay of Fundy islands of New Brunswick will be one of the most unforgettable experiences of your trip down east. The islands of Grand Manan, Deer Island and Campobello are all easily accessible by car and ferry and each has a unique flavour. The largest island Grand Manan has much to offer in the way of very unusual vacation possibilities. The ferry to Grand Manan departs from Blacks Harbour which is roughly halfway between Saint John and Saint Andrews. If you have bicycles you might consider leaving your car at Blacks Harbour. Bikes are easy to manage on […]

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Fundy Trail Parkway an Unforgettable Oceanside Experience

One of the greatest wonders among many that surround the Bay of Fundy is the Fundy Trail Parkway. It starts 10 km to the east of St Martins. Just follow the road after you have crossed the two covered bridges at the harbour in St Martins. The Fundy Trail Parkway gives access to the wilderness environment of the coast of the Bay of Fundy. Numerous lookouts along the way have been developed with the intention of providing the best views of the coastline. You will find that when you stop at any one of these it is impossible to avoid […]

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St. Martins a Charming Victorian Village

The gateway to the Fundy Trail is the picturesque village of St. Martins. Just a half-hour drive from Saint John airport, St. Martins is an absolute must for the New Brunswick tourist’s itinerary. It is a beautiful little village that is spread out along a single street running along the coast of the Bay of Fundy. The main street of St. Martins is flanked by several Victorian houses some of which are quite grand. These houses were built by 19th century residents who were skilled craftsmen. They honed their trade in working with wood by building ships in the great […]

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There’s a Lot to Do in St. Andrews

The town of St. Andrews-by-the-Sea has been a favourite with vacationers and tourists in New Brunswick for well over a century. Founded by Loyalists in 1783, St. Andrews became a favoured place for the wealthy from Boston to Montreal to while away the summer months in well appointed hotels and luxurious summer homes. They arrived on trains with their entourage of servants and all necessary supplies. These well-heeled, summer residents who sought a respite from the heat and congestion of large eastern cities where they made their money, established a kind of elegance that persists in St. Andrews today. The […]

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Sackville – Nature, Horses, Art and Poetry

Sackville is right on the eastern border of the Province of New Brunswick. It is a rewarding stop when either entering or leaving the province. It is a quaint university town set in a particularly unusual environment on the edge of the Tantramar Marshes. A jewel in the crown of Sackville’s tourist attractions is the Sackville Waterfowl Park located appropriately on Mallard Drive. Extensive boardwalks take you over the fragile environment which is inhabited by a wide number of bird species including, rails, coots, grebes and bitterns. You can take a self-guided tour following a printed guide which includes a […]

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Dulse … Yuck or Yum?

Ok So when in Rome do as the Romans they always say. Well when in Saint John, New Brunswick or anywhere along the Fundy Coast you may find it difficult to know what to do when it comes to dulse. First off what is dulse? It is basically dried seaweed. And people eat it. Now if that does not get your saliva glands moving what does? This particular species of seaweed is harvested from the sea floor during the low tides found along the Fundy Shore. These tides are the highest and conversely the lowest ocean tides in the world […]

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